Photography student opens senior capstone exhibit

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Senior visual communication design major Greg Kingery showcased his photos in the temporary student gallery in the Schwitzer Student Center from Monday, Nov. 17, to Saturday, Nov. 22. His official showing was on Wednesday, Nov. 19, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. when students could view his artwork and interact with him as well. His gallery show featured 15 of his best photos taken since he has been at UIndy.

Beyond what students see on display in the galleries, a great deal goes into each photo, in terms of taking the photos, editing them and gathering the supplies to properly prepare each piece to be displayed.

Much of Kingery’s subject matter focused on nature and portrait shots. In his culminating body of work, he chose pictures he had taken as early as 2011 and as late as 2014.

Senior visual communication design major Greg Kingery’s photographs hung in the student gallery located in the Schwitzer Student Center for his senior capstone exhibit. Photo by Kameron Casey

Senior visual communication design major Greg Kingery’s photographs hung in the student gallery located in the Schwitzer Student Center for his senior capstone exhibit. Photo by Kameron Casey

“It was really tough to choose,” Kingery said. “It took me about two-and-a-half to three weeks just to choose what I wanted to use. And actually, one of the ones I did choose, once I blew it up to the size I wanted it to be, it came out a little more blurry than I wanted.”

Some of the important factors in Kingery’s selection were the contrast in the photos and the viewing angles, to ensure that he could convey a variety in his shots.

Like Kingery, every graduating senior must complete a capstone, and according to Associate Professor of Art and Design Donna Adams, for most it is an exhibition. For an exhibition, an artist must complete an artist statement, produce labels for each piece, plan a reception and make posters to promote the exhibit.

“[It involves] all the professional things that adult artists out in the real world really do,” Adams said. “It’s the culminating class in any art curriculum.”

All students create a unique body of work, spending countless hours picking photos to fit their message as well as creating new work to include in their galleries.

“They are not just showing you what they have learned, but also who they have become,” Adams said. “So the more they can show you, the better feel you have of it.”

Another important factor in each student’s production is the cost to display each piece. Students are required to cover all costs for printing, cutting, matting, backing, framing and hanging each piece as well as for printing the posters for the gallery. According to Adams, each student will end up spending more than $100 per piece. Art 470 Senior Portfolio students usually display approximately 15 pieces, while Art 471 Senior Thesis students display approximately 25 pieces.

“All the materials take quite a bit of time and money to gather up,” Kingery said. “Not one Hobby Lobby or Michael’s has all the frames that you need. One picture is about $100 to $150, depending on what frame, plexiglass, all that kind of stuff.”

According to Kingery, he was prepared for the cost and even picked up a job during the semester to help offset the cost of the gallery.

“I don’t think I faced any [challenges],” he said. “It’s more the nerves of having this big of an exhibition. Donna and the art department have done a good job preparing me.”

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