Students expose themselves to ‘Live Group Sex Therapy’

by Quiaira Johnson | Staff Writer
Published: Last Updated on

Comedian Daniel Packard brought his show “Live Group Sex Therapy Show” to the University of  Indianapolis on Feb. 3. The show included comedy along with audience participation. UIndy Hall was practically full as the audience was split down the middle separating the men from the women.

The event, hosted by the UIndy Campus Program Board, included deep truths, humor and lots of crowd participation in activities designed to help individuals create the types of relationships they desired.

Packard opened the show with humor to discuss the differences between men and women and their responses to questions regarding relationships.

He began with some jokes about sex and some of his past experiences in relationships. However, the show took a turn when Packard revealed that the show would not be about sex but about love—how to connect a person, how people define love and why they fear it.

“The name of the show is ‘Live Group Sex Therapy Show,’” Packard said.  “However, the show is not about sex. I believe that this show if you listen, you may learn something or have a realization that will actually help you be more confident so that you will actually connect with someone you really like and then have good sex with them.”

Packard then let the audience know that the show was full of dialogue and if anyone had any questions or disagreed with the things he was saying, he or she should not to be afraid to speak up.

“I am here as an advocate for everybody, but especially I’m here as an advocate for women, and men,” Packard said. “However, everything that I have comes from a straight experience that I can talk from. What I talk about here should be applicable to everyone.”

Packard then began to read responses to a series of questions that each person had answered upon entering the hall: “What frustrates you about the opposite sex? Why does this make you frustrated? How do you respond to them? What would you change about yourself to get people to like you and how you know it’s going to help?”

As the response to each question was read it sparked conversation throughout the room, between the audience members and Packard.

Sophomore psychology major Alexis Fort felt that the method Packard used was helpful.

“It was good to be able to hear the different responses to the questions,” Fort said. “Although Daniel made it easier by adding a comedic side to it, it was good to hear that some people felt the exact same way I did when it comes to certain situations.”

Packard continued with reading the responses to the questions and later had the audience yell out the things they get angry about regarding the opposite sex.

“That thing that you think you’re pissed about, that thing is not really what you’re mad about. It’s this belief that somehow if the other side was different, that things would work out because they’re the problem,” he said. “If you’re not finding love right now, it isn’t about that.”

Packard used different people from the audience to conquer their fears and view themselves differently to discuss the fear and anger regarding relationships. He then asked the audience if it was okay to judge one another based on their insecurities and actions in relationships.

“The reason you think you don’t have love in your life is just an excuse,” Packard said. “But you just don’t know it’s an excuse.”

Packard then closed out the show by letting the audience know that the moment they got over their insecurities and fears,  stopped blaming the opposite sex for their problems and embraced themselves, they would not only find love but embrace it, because they would be satisfied with themselves.

“The show was amazing. It opened my eyes to so much—things that I would have never even thought about,” Fort said. “Daniel really did an awesome job and kept me engaged the entire show.”

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