Kesha: “High Road” Review

When I was younger, the only Kesha song I knew was “Tik Tok” from the game “Just Dance.” I figured she’d always be that spunky star that’s full of energy and always talking about some sort of party. “High Road” showed me what I thought was something new, soft and caring. I appreciated the mix of the high energy and chill songs, and overall, it’s a well-rounded album, but it sounded like she revamped all of her old music. 

That doesn’t mean this isn’t the exact same album as her previous hits. “Tonight” might as well be a modern version of “Tik Tok.” They even have the same beat, it’s just a bit sped up. As the old saying goes: “If it’s not broken, don’t fix it.”  I guess Kesha took that literally and copied and pasted the song. The calm piano at the beginning of the album is a good opener for this strange album, though. It’s nothing special, especially since you can hear Kesha’s autotune in “Tonight.” “My Own Dance” is a super trendy sounding song. I wouldn’t be surprised if this song appears on platforms like Instagram, YouTube and TikTok, where people dance to it. It’s very upbeat, Kesha’s lyrics are sassy as can be, and I’m kind of here for it. I love a song that commands attention and so many aspects of this song do just that. 

“So aggressive, passive-aggressive. Delete the message and pass me a beverage,” Kesha is quite literally using a classic cheer anthem with a twist in the album’s namesake “High Road.” It’s a cute song for sure, good beat, just like in the others, but there’s not much to it other than a repetition of her past hits.

The overall tone of this album seems to be a bunch of high energy emotions flying all over, with a few good beats and lots of clever lyrics. I can see some people putting lyrics like “Delete my number b_tch sayonara,” from “Honey” in their bios.

Overall, no matter how well rounded it is in terms of tone of the songs, I can’t see it being a hit. I wanted her to do something new and “Potato Song (Cuz I Want To)” is not quite what I meant. That song is so different, it just seems like a kids song turned grotesque because of the awkward beat and dark theme. 

This is a good album to turn on in the car to drive, but it’s nothing special.